Juneteenth, Free-ish Since 1865

Juneteenth, Free-ish Since 1865. Juneteenth marks the 'End' of Slavery in the US after the civil war. In Texas, two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, General Granger's announced in 1865 put into effect the end of slavery.

Juneteenth, Free-ish Since 1865

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TODAY... is Juneteeth. We hope you have the day off, but if not, you can still celebrate no matter where you are.

What Is Juneteenth ?


Juneteenth marks the 'End' of Slavery in the US after the civil war. In Texas, two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, General Granger's announced in 1865 put into effect the end of slavery.

Two years, was two years too long in my opinion. The holiday was first celebrated at church picnics and speeches, the tradition spread across the US as Black Texans moved to different states.

Who Gets The Day Off ?

On June 17, 2021, President Joe Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act making Juneteenth a federal holiday. While a Federal holiday, it is not a satate holiday in most states. A state holiday is paid time off for state employees.

Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Texas, Virginia, and Washington already had state holidays, in the last year,  Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Nebraska, Ohio, and South Dakota added Juneteeth as a state holiday.

Why Do We Call it Juneteenth?

Sure, we could call it June 19th, but, lets be honest,  Juneteeth sounds better. The term Juneteenth is a blend of the words June and nineteenth. The holiday is also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day.


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